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Posts Tagged ‘Adriel Hampton’

I am writing to ask you to join Adriel Nation, my network for promoting emerging technologies for better government, democracy and self-governance and for sharing opportunities to help charities around the world. All  of my blogging is now on this new platform, powered by NationBuilder.

Adriel Nation has two key focuses: promoting emerging technologies for improving democratic and self governance (Gov 2.0 RadioNationBuildercivic tech events and more); and using social networks to create awareness of and raise funds for organizations doing social good (XBAR Gives and more).

If you join, you will also have the opportunity to suggest organizations we should be supporting and to make other suggestions for the focus of Adriel Nation.

Thank you!

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I’m speaking at Beyond 2010 Edmonton next week, and, stepping out from my usual social media, open data and Gov 2.0 fare, my presentation ties personal childhood passions and forever dreams into a talk called “Sci-fi, Digital Society and the Future of Governance.” Here’s a look at several of the books that figure into this look at ‘today’ and tomorrows that might be (Amazon affiliate links):

The Future of Work: How the New Order of Business Will Shape Your Organization, Your Management Style and Your Life (Malone, 2004)

You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto (Lanier, 2010)

Player Piano (Vonnegut, 1952)

Foundation and the Robot Series (Foundation Novels) (Asimov, 1950-1985)

Flickr photo of Zhou Renti and his android by Montauk Beach

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My fall schedule is quite busy, and I’m looking forward to meet many of my social media friends at several upcoming speaking engagements.

So you’ll know where to find me:

Citizen 2.0 Workshop – Sunday, Sept. 19, 2-4 p.m., Fairfield, CA – I’ll be leading a session on social media for progressive activists and campaign workers at the Solano County Democratic Party Headquarters;

NAGW National Conference – Sept. 21-22, St. Louis, MO – I’ll be leading a workshop and a regular conference session on social media for government;

CityCampSF – Oct. 16-17, San Francisco, CA – I’m an organizer of this unconference, and will be proposing sessions on social media, neighborhood beautification and mobile apps, and a public art location-based app check-in race;

Beyond 2010 – October 20-23, Edmonton, AB, Canada – I’ll be speaking in Edmonton on the 21st, on “Sci-fi, Digital Society and the Future of Governance,” holding a social media workshop for City of Edmonton’s IT branch, and meeting up with friends from Twitter and Empire Avenue;

How To: Podcasting – October 28, Oakland, CA – Joe Hackman and I are the guest speakers at Jonathan Fleming’s East Bay LocalPreneurs meetup, talking about our respective podcasts and sharing tips;

Gravity Summit – November 8-9, Irvine, CA – I’ll be keynoting the Social Media and Government event, talking about going to the next level with conversation and collaboration for governments and campaigns;

Keep up with me on Twitter, and I’ll be Plancasting these events as well. Hope to see you soon!

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Allie Wojtaszek of Edmonton, Alberta, is one of the top members on the social media influence market Empire Avenue, and a prolific photographer. I interview Allie about Empire Avenue and Flickr, where she is ranked as the most influential member on EA.

Adriel Hampton: Allie, with recent updates to Empire Avenue, you’re the No. 3 in price on the site, and the top Flickr member. EA didn’t even have Flickr at first. How did you find out about it (EA), and what first drove you to be an active member?

Allie: I found out about Empire Avenue when I met (co-founder) Dups at a Tech Start Up in Edmonton. I knew I wanted to be a part of it right away.

Adriel: You’re a self-avowed early adopter, but what it is that got you to stick with EA? I know I’ve tried and dumped a fair number of social networks.

Allie: I find EA rewarding (in the sense of game play, it’s fun) but what really made me stick with it was the community it created and the people I have had a chance to connect with there. The strength of EA as a social networking tool is attractive.

Adriel: You’re a social person! Before we start talking Flickr, what is it about the Empire Avenue community you found so attractive?

Allie: I like that EA connects with all the other social networking sites that I find important and useful. I love that EA has given me the opportunity to connect with people all over the world. Their ideas now influence and expand me.

Adriel: A small yet-international community, yeah, that’s super cool. So, Flickr. I hardly knew Flickr was a social network, but obviously you’ve been thriving a long time there. How did that start?

Allie: I needed a place to put my pictures online when I switched to digital. I was using Yahoo, tried Picasa. But when I found Flickr, I was sold. I’ve been using it now since 2005 as a pro member (which I totally recommend).

Adriel: I went Pro because of Empire Avenue! It is great for storage. Do you also back up your pictures, or is everything on Yahoo’s cloud?

Allie: I also use Mozy.com for backing up my pictures. Yes, I love them that much. Plus, I tend to only put pictures I like or that have significance to me on Flickr. I have thousands of other pictures to back up.

Adriel: Not surprised! When you do a shoot, do you post most or all of your pictures to Flickr, or are you really selective? I see both styles on the site.

Allie: I do try to be selective. I want people to like my pictures and want to visit, so I aim for the best quality I can provide.

Adriel: I’m guessing it won’t be long before you have a thousand Flickr contacts. Have you met a lot of folks there?

Allie: I know a few contacts in real life as well as on Flickr. We have Flickr photo walks and meetups here in Edmonton.

Adriel: That’s cool. Lot of that in SF, but I haven’t been to one yet. Are you a trained photographer, or self-taught?

Allie: No training, so I guess that makes me self taught. I see pictures everywhere. At some point someone gave me a camera, and I’ve never looked back. I think I was 8 years old.

Adriel: What are you shooting with these days? Do you do any post-processing?

Allie: I use a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTi. I usually will auto correct for colors if need be and have been known to crop.

Adriel: Obviously you’ve put serious time into Flickr, but what’s your best advice for Empire Avenue folks looking to build a network there?

Allie: I would first say select good and interesting photo’s to post. Don’t dump or flood your page or people won’t want to look. Give every picture a title, description and tags. Add them to a set if applicable. Then find groups for them. Then you can post links to your pictures on other sites to entice people to come and see your Flickr profile. I would also suggest interacting with your audience – answering comments and checking out their pictures and leaving comments. Groups are great for exposure but also advice and tips. Flickr people are amazing at sharing advice!

Adriel: Again with the mind reading. I was just typing a question about groups. Tell me, how many photos do you think is right to upload in a session/day?

Allie: To be honest I think the less the better. I think quality is way more important than quantity. So I try to do no more than 25. And that would really be a lot – like vacation pictures (which I take a lot of). But I don’t know if there is a right/wrong amount to upload in a day. If you want people to look, less is better.

Adriel: How has EA changed your Flickr experience?

Allie: When Empire Avenue added Flickr, my enjoyment of it escalated. I love that I’ve had more exposure, but EA also helps to find new contacts.

Adriel: Makes a lot of sense. Thanks for your time! Any last words for your fans on EA and Flickr?

Allie: I’d like to say thanks to everyone who supports me on Empire Avenue and Flickr. If it wasn’t for them, none of it would be fun at all.

Adriel: Awesome. And thanks for all your great community building on EA.

Allie: Thanks Adriel, this was fun! I could talk about Flickr all day.

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Most of what I’m doing on Twitter on a daily basis is working to build community. I’ve also got several other places where I’m doing similar things, but Twitter is definitely the largest pool where I reach out to new people to grow my personal network and evangelize a vision for government reform through social and collaborative technologies (Government 2.0). Consistently working on a large and closely connected personal Twitter network also helps when I have a need, like when I was trying to help a friend find a marrow donor for his sick daughter a few months back. A point I make frequently is that you always want to build your network before you really need it.

So, today I was doing some pruning of the folks I follow on Twitter. This can be tedious work, but it’s important to my networking efforts. I try to follow back most accounts that follow me, as long as they look like they have live people or organizations behind them. Plenty slip through the cracks, though, and I begin find my feed a bit overrun with people using FriendFeed, Facebook and a slew of other services to pipe content to Twitter with zero interaction there. Unless it’s content highly useful to me – like feeds from a few blogs and news agencies – I generally unfollow those sorts of accounts.

Cutting loose spammy and dead accounts
During this exercise, I also notice two kinds of accounts from people who are obviously trying to use Twitter as a networking tool, but are going astray. There are the accounts obviously auto-following people (look for 1-to-1 follower-following ratios) and having little luck at engagement, and then there are those who’ve simply stopped tweeting.

Reviewing these accounts, it’s often clear that they had purpose in getting started, whether to tweet at a conference, to promote their business, or simple to build that network before it’s needed. Many of the folks who stop tweeting don’t say why, but enough do that I’m guessing it’s because they simple aren’t getting the kind of engagement they were promised or expecting. Sometimes they’re discouraged because they’ve got hundreds of Twitter followers but only a few of those click on the links they share.

Strategic networking
My advice for networking on Twitter – and I believe the informational networking there is tremendously valuable – is to be strategic in how you build out your community. For example, if you’re trying to market SEO services, and sign up for a service that auto-follows anyone who tweets the words “social media,” you’ve totally missed any sort of practical audience. Sure, you can all retweet each others’ links and tidbits of wisdom, and yes, that may increase your personal SEO (which is one of the few good reasons to crank out content on Twitter without and personal engagement). But it’s not likely to get you customers. What if instead you identified local businesses and Chamber of Commerce members engaging on Twitter who might be interested in your services? Start interacting with them; build a relationship that will lead to real business.

If you’re the conferencegoer, figure out what Twitter hashtag people are using to tweet about the event, and make connections before, during and after by merging your Twitter and offline networking. Chances are, Twitter connections established there will continue due to shared interest or profession.

Government 2.0
Twitter has been an extremely valuable tool for the Government 2.0 movement. Last week, Gov 2.0 consultant Maxine Teller commented on why she thinks it’s important that Twitter is hiring a government liaison, explaining how Mark Drapeau convinced her to start using Twitter actively in 2008 after she’d stopped:

The whole reason that you and I were jazzed about Twitter back then was because it was – and still is – a great way for us to find and connect with like-minded folks who believe – and are using – emerging tools and technologies enable us to more efficiently and effectively achieve our government missions.

To repeat the mantra that we’ve all chanted in our Gov 2.0 conference and event presentations umpteen times, Gov 2.0 (despite its software release naming convention) is not about the tools and technologies; it’s about the collaborative interactions, innovative thinking, and revolutionary approaches that these tools and technologies catalyze and enable.

In late 2009, Gartner consultant Andrea DiMaio published a research noted defining Government 2.0 as “the use of IT to socialize and commoditize government services, processes and data.” His definition is one of the most solid and comprehensive I’ve seen, and it encapsulates many of the reasons social technologies are important to other businesses sectors as well:

The socialization of information has multiple facets (government to citizens, citizens to government and government to government) and the boundaries between these facets are increasingly blurred. The next step will be the socialization of services and processes by engaging individuals and communities to perform part of existing government processes or transform them by leveraging external data and applications.

Commoditization – which has already started with consolidation and shared services to reduce the diversity of infrastructure and horizontal application – will gradually move toward services and business processes.

Government 2.0 has seven main characteristics:

* It is citizen-driven.

* It is employee-centric.

* It keeps evolving.

* It is transformational.

* It requires a blend of planning and nurturing.

* It needs Pattern-Based Strategy capabilities.

* It calls for a new management style.

Food for thought.

Resources:

Twitter Strategy for Agencies and Causes

Why and How: Local Twitter Lists

Government 2.0: A Gartner Definition

Drapeau: Government 2.0 Movement Seemingly Passes by Twitter, Inc.

Posted via email from Wired to Share

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You like those stories about the new words that make it into Webster’s each year, right? Well, I’m putting my Cal Rhetoric degree on the line to state that “Gov 2.0” is headed that way.

Plenty of smarter people have written a lot about the “language panel” at February’s Gov 2.0 LA Camp, which was more of a look at humanizing a movement that could easily devolve into a technocratic and ultimately narrow-minded clique than it was about trying to do away with jargon. But every now and then, we want to define our terms and argue about them, and this past weekend was as good a time to do that as any.

I want to cite quickly why I’m convinced the term “Gov 2.0” is here to stay.

First, the term is a semantic umbrella for several movements with real muscle: open government (in the sense of transparent decision-making, “sunshine”/”sunlight”); open source software in government; free release of data collected by governments, preferably in machine-readable format; social media in government; collaboration, crowdsourcing and prediction markets in government; and traditional “eGov” online services. Really, the term has already taken on a much broader meaning than even “Web 2.0.”

Next, I could cite the growing number of uncamps around Gov 2.0 or the fact that a growing number of public sector workers are embracing the term to describe their interest in shiny-cool government reform. Growing adoption of the term to describe a number of related and not-so-related initiatives and movements is part of the foundation for my opinion. But the key conversation that tipped me was a recent sit-down with Laurel Ruma, the chief Gov 2.0 evangelist for O’Reilly Media. Now, it might not agree with everything Tim O’Reilly says, but each time I’ve interacted with one of his company’s employees, I’ve come away impressed. O’Reilly Media is a serious company that picks its tech advocacy battles for the long haul – open source and Web 2.0 being the big ones – and with some great success. The fact that O’Reilly has staked a claim on Gov 2.0 and Ruma’s assertion that the company anticipates a decade-long evolution of the movement (O’Reilly’s definition is “gov as a platform“), give me faith that whatever tech-enabled reform good government folks are working on in 2015, it will still fall under the umbrella of Gov 2.0.

Last Saturday night, I was around bouncing Bill Grundfest’s Gov 2.0 LA language thoughts with Chris Heuer, co-founder of the Social Media Club. (Heuer’s definition is “technology making government better.”) Anyone who says “social media” with a straight face has already been in a few debates about the term, and staking his business model on it means Heuer’s been at the center of the blogwars over how to describe the ever-evolving world of zero-cost communications. With his frank style, Heuer explained that whatever arguments exist, at some point people just call something what they call it.

“Gov 2.0” may be a Rorschach blot, but it’s here to stay.

~ Adriel Hampton is a public servant and host of Gov 2.0 Radio. Sometimes he stays up late at night wondering how to pronounce periods, and what they mean for search trends.

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